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« Canadian Media Bark Up the Wrong Tree In Lebanon Ambush | Main | Dead Photojournalist Waiting To Happen »

Thursday, August 5 2010

Border Clash: A Case Study in Reuters Photography

Reuters_Logo The sheer number of photos involved makes this post both daunting and necessary.

Daunting, because 25 is a lot of images (and captions) to look over and post. Necessary, because this is the only way to demonstrate how far over the top Reuters photographers went in covering Tuesday's clash along the Israeli-Lebanese border. The images also raise some very troubling questions.

The Issues

1. Five photographers, (in addition to an unknown number of stringers) from one news service covering what was supposed to be routine IDF border maintenance work is astounding.

The Reuters photographers identified with photo credits are Ali Hashisho, Hamad Almakt, Kamel Jaber, Baz Ratner, and Karamallah Daher (not to be confused with AP photographer Ronith Daher who also covered the border skirmish). Ratner and Almakt worked on the Israeli side of the border. The rest of the images are from the Lebanese side.

2. Reuters' coverage and access to so many positions along the border makes us wonder if some or all of these photographers expected to "only" cover IDF gardening or the start of the next Lebanon war.

Reuters' photos simply blew away the other news agencies. Had the skirmish escalated, the wire service would have been well-poised to produce lots of gory images of dead and injured Lebanese soldiers and civilians.

3. It's reasonable to assume Reuters' picture desk staff and editors knew what was going on. There's no way the picture desk could have been flooded with these kinds of images without higher ups wondering how so many photographers were able to share the same scoop.

4. Some images of Israeli soldiers taken from the Lebanese side of the border are so close, it's a miracle that more journalists weren't killed or injured by IDF fire. In the heat of battle, it's very easy to confuse large camera equipment, like a zoom lens, with a weapon.

As it was, Assaf Abu Rahhal of the pro-Syrian paper, al-Akhbar was killed, while Ali Chouaib of Hezbollah's Al-Manar was injured.

5. Seven of the 25 pictures (28 percent) have an unidentified "stringer" photo credit; this is very suspicious and leaves a lot of unanswered questions as to who the photographers are.

Common practice is for stringers -- local free-lance photographers not employed by the news service -- to be credited by name, followed by the word "Stringer" or "STR" to indicate the photographer's status. None of the seven stringer photo credits identified anyone by name.

6. One photographer deserving closer scrutiny is Ali Hashisho. Judging from his especially close access and captions, it's worth asking if Hashisho also serves in the Lebanese Army, UNIFIL, or some other position that might be a conflict of interest with his work for Reuters.

7. We linked to the images on DayLife for further documentation.

8. HonestReporting obtained six unpublished graphic photos which we are including in this post. Despite their graphic nature, we are including those images because they further demonstrate the unrestricted access the Reuters photographers enjoyed. All are branded with Reuters watermarks.

9. It should be noted that Reuters wasn't the only agency with photographers on scene. AP, for example, had its own photographic issues which we blogged Tuesday night. However, for the reasons listed above, we're singling out Reuters for special attention.


The Photographs


Reuters01

Israeli soldiers hold weapons at a look out point in Kibbutz Misgav Am near the border with Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli and Lebanese troops fought a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday that killed four Lebanese and an Israeli officer in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war. REUTERS/Hamad Almakt


Reuters02


The body of Assaf Abu Rahhal, a reporter and photographer, and correspondent for al-Akhbar newspaper, is seen after he was killed during clashes between Lebanese and Israeli soldiers at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli and Lebanese troops fought a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday that killed four Lebanese and an Israeli officer in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war. Reuters/Ali Hashisho


Reuters03

An Israeli soldier holds a machine gun atop an armoured jeep near the border with Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli and Lebanese troops fought a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday that killed four Lebanese and an Israeli officer in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war. Reuters/Baz Ratner

Reuters04

An United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) employee walks past a burnt field after clashes between Lebanese and Israeli soldiers at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli and Lebanese troops fought a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday that killed four Lebanese and an Israeli officer in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho


Reuters05

Assaf Abu Rahhal, a reporter and photographer, and correspondent for al-Akhbar newspaper, who died during clashes between Lebanese and Israeli soldiers at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon is seen in this undated handout obtained August 3, 2010. Rahhal was one of four Lebanese killed in a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday between Israeli and Lebanese troops. An Israeli officer was also killed in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war. REUTERS/ Handout


Reuters06

Lebanese soldiers take up position as U.N peacekeepers (in blue berets) gesture towards Israeli soldiers at the Lebanese-Israeli border in Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. REUTERS/ STR


 

Reuters07

Zahiya Hamoushi, a villager, reacts during clashes between Lebanese and Israeli soldiers at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli and Lebanese troops fought a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday that killed four Lebanese and an Israeli officer in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho


Reuters08

U.N peacekeepers in armoured vehicles inspect the area where clashes between Lebanese and Israeli soldiers took place at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli and Lebanese troops fought a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday that killed four Lebanese and an Israeli officer in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war. Reuters/Ali Hashisho


Reuters09

Remains of a dead Lebanese soldier are seen scattered on a street at a checkpoint for the Lebanese army at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli and Lebanese troops fought a rare cross-border skirmish on Tuesday that killed four Lebanese and an Israeli officer in the most serious violence along the frontier since a 2006 war.  REUTERS/Ali Hashisho


Reuters10

A rifle lies on the boot and part of a dead Lebanese soldier's leg at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho


 

Reuters11

A dead Lebanese soldier lies on a street at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said.REUTERS/Ali Hashisho


 

Reuters12

A dead Lebanese soldier lies on a street at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. REUTERS/ Ali Hashisho


Reuters13

Lebanese medics and soldiers lift a Lebanese soldier wounded by an Israeli tank, onto a stretcher at Adaisseh village, village southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho


Reuters14

A Lebanese soldier wounded by an Israeli tank, lies on a street at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. Reuters/Ali Hashisho


Reuters15

Civilians help a wounded Lebanese soldier at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. Reuters/Kamel Jaber


Reuters16

A Lebanese soldier helps a wounded soldier at Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles ata Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho

 

Reuters17

An U.N. peacekeeper waves a United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) flag at Israeli soldiers on the Lebanese-Israeli border at Adaisseh village,southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. REUTERS/STR


Reuters18

Lebanese soldiers and U.N. peacekeepers (L and 3rd L) stand at the Lebanese-Israeli border in Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israelihelicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. REUTERS/STR


Reuters19

Lebanese soldiers take up position as U.N peacekeepers (in blue berets) gesture towards Israeli soldiers at the Lebanese-Israeli border in Adaisseh village,southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. An Israeli helicopter on Tuesday fired two missiles at a Lebanese army post near the southern border village of Adaisseh, destroying an armoured personnel carrier, a security source said. A Lebanese journalist and three Lebanese soldiers died after the Israeli and Lebanese armies exchanged fire in the border area, a security source said. REUTERS/STR


Reuters20

An Israeli soldier is seen on a crane on the Lebanese side of the Lebanese-Israeli border near Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeliartillery shelled the Lebanese village on Tuesday, wounding two people, after Lebanese Army troops fired warning shots at Israeli soldiers along the usually quiet but tense frontier, witnesses said. REUTERS/STR


Reuters21

Israeli soldiers take up position near the border with Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli artillery shelled a Lebanese village on Tuesday, wounding two people,after Lebanese Army troops fired warning shots at Israeli soldiers along the usually quiet but tense frontier, witnesses said. REUTERS/Hamad Almakt


Reuters22

An Israeli soldier is seen on a crane on the Lebanese side on the Lebanese-Israeli borders near Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon, August 3, 2010. Israeli artillery shelled a Lebanese village Tuesday, wounding two people, after Lebanese Army troops fired warning shots at Israeli soldiers along the usually quiet but tense frontier, witnesses said. REUTERS/Stringer


Reuters23

U.N. peacekeepers gesture and shout at Israeli soldiers on the Lebanese-Israeli borders near Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon, August 3, 2010. Israeli artillery shelled a Lebanese village Tuesday, wounding two people, after Lebanese Army troops fired warning shots at Israeli soldiers along the usually quiet but tense frontier, witnesses said. REUTERS/STR


Reuters24

Lebanese soldiers and U.N peacekeepers patrol the area near Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli artillery shelled the Lebanese village Tuesday, wounding two people, after Lebanese Army troops fired warning shots at Israeli soldiers along the usually quiet but tense frontier, witnesses said. REUTERS/ Karmallah Daher


Reuters25

U.N peacekeepers on their armoured vehicles patrol Adaisseh village, southern Lebanon August 3, 2010. Israeli artillery shelled the Lebanese village onTuesday, wounding two people, after Lebanese Army troops fired warning shots at Israeli soldiers along the usually quiet but tense frontier, witnesses said. REUTERS/ Karamallah Daher

 

Troubling Questions

The pattern we see in these 25 images raises serious questions about Reuters.

1. How were five photographers encouraged to cover routine IDF maintenance work -- which is simply non-news? Who tipped them off, and why?

2. How did Reuters photographers get such wide, unrestricted access to the combat zone?

3. Who are the unidentified stringers? Do they, or any of the five identified photographers, have any conflicts of interest requiring disclosure, in the interests of ethical journalism? Why did Reuters break with journalistic norms and not credit seven images with the photographer's name? 

4. Is it fair to say that the Lebanese source who tipped off journalists to be in the Adaisseh area of the border bears responibility for the death of Assaf Abu Rahhal?

5. Did any higher ups in the Reuters chain of command raise any questions?

 

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Comments

These are certainly a lot of questions, and just by asking so many the reader is left to feel there is something suspicious going on. This is the equivalent of asking someone repeated questions about his timing, location and intention in crossing a street. Asked with enough detail and the implication of something wrong, naturally it all looks very suspicious, such as "Why did you cross at 2:03, instead of 2:08?"
The simple answer to nearly all your questions is that a lot of stringers are based about seven minutes drive from the site of the incident and came immediately when they heard there was shooting. There are no pictures of the shooting itself because, evidently, most of the stringers arrived after it was over. (I assume, but can't sday for sure, that the reporters who was killed arrived for the second round of shooting.)
As to why they were allowed access, I suspect the LAF doesn't exercise a lot of discipline in declaring closed military areas and the press has a free run.
Finally, I don't see any critique of the photos images or the captions themselves, and see no reason to make any. They seem on the whole fair and descriptive. In other words, no journalistic violations were committed, so why are you implying with your many questions that there are violators?
The caption of the tree-cutting, which seems to have exercised so many people in the blogosphere, is a non-issue. The caption was corrected.
If you look hard enough for anti-Israel bias (and I don't say there isn't any, it's just horribly exaggerated), you can always find some.

Daviid: The photo captions report the LAF version - especially "warning shots" - as fact.

It is odd that journalists were there at all. Do they hang around in such numbers all the time?

Given that Israel claims this was a deliberate ambush, it is absolutely valid to check facts carefully.

As I mentioned previously, Al Manar had a written report on the web less than 45 mins after this started, noting that a Lt. Col. had been killed. Israel did not release that information until much later in the day. This demands some level of coordination between the snipers and al Manar possibly via Reuters or at least with their knowledge as they were on the scene.

Daviid, I'm with Brad. You're correct that with the right questions one could make crossing the road look suspicious, but this is the equivalent of five photographers happening to turn up when I cross the road and get run over by somebody who hates me. Too many coincidences.

@Daviid says:

"If you look hard enough for anti-Israel bias...you can ALWAYS find some."

Indeed.

Daviid: The photos depicting the IDF troops triming the tree clearly were taken from the Lebanon side of the fence, and was clearly taken before any shooting began. This means that Reuters photographers were already in position before any shooting began. They did not rush to the location after they heard about the shooting as you sugested.

What is going on with the Lebanese soldiers with the R.P.G, take up position near the U.N peacekeeper ?

Did he thought to usu the U.N peacekeeper as human shield against possible Israeli retaliation ?

And if there is going to be an Israeli retaliation, a retaliation for what reason ?

Strange & suspicious story & facts.

Hummm - isn't the UNIFIL force supposed to be IN BETWEEN the Lebanese and Israeli forces - in that, ah, demilitarized, "no man's land" area? Then why are they seen WITH the LAF in the photos???

So now will someone explain WHY?

It happens continually.

The BBC, CNN, etc, etc,

What is it with these journalists that makes them so bare faced bias-

Is there an underlying anti-Semitism that is showing itself in an anti-Israeli front?

I was at Kibbutz Misgav Am a week and a half ago with Bnei Akiva Israel Machane, and the guy who spoke to us from the position that the first photo was taken told us that the lebanese village below is a firing range into Israel. Some people from the group didn't accept this, and said he was exaggerating... I believed him, and here is some concrete proof!

Anybody notice the biased comments? "warning shots" from the lebanese side. mentioning of lebanese dead only, repeatedly describing the location as "...at Adaisseh village..." or even "...in Adaisseh village..." when they are showing lebanese soldiers and UNIFIL taking positions on the border. This clearly gives the impression that Israel is targeting an innocent village. Which is it, the border or the village?
Why do most pictures only mention "israeli shelling", "israeli missiles" without any mention of fire from the lebanese side, giving the impression that they did so without any provocation. Just for fun?
Keep in mind that each picture stands on its own without the possible "balance" from the caption of additional pictures.
So now please tell me there is no obvious bias!

Here's my take. Hezbollah orchestrates the incident and the media coverage. It is no secret that Hezbollah is trying to cram the Lebanese army with its supporters. After the Israel forces respond to the provocation from the Lebanese side of the border, there are cries to beef up the Lebanese army. What new recruits will respond? Hezbollah, of course.

The caption "fired warning shots". It's interesting, but the Lt. Col. was not standing near the border and the crane. He was on a hill overlooking the area, a few hundred feet away. More like sniper fire well aimed than warning shots.

What angers me is the photos are salacious and gory... This is simply disgusting anti-Israel bias! Where are the photos of the Lt. Col lying dead! Where are the photos of the officer who was critically injured all BEFORE Israel retaliated!!!!!
Give me a break from this manipulation of facts by Lebanon and the Media

I feel you missed the most important troubling issue in Reuters reporting. All the pictures, all the captions imply that Israel started this incident. All the pictures of UN personnel show the UN trying to communicate with Israeli soldiers to stop, as if they instigated and continued the incident and needed to be stopped. All this is contrary to even the UN's own account of what happened. Finally, all the captions list the Lebanese casualties but none list the Israeli casualties. I find the attempt to distort the narrative and label this incident Israeli aggression very upsetting. Where is the honest reporting?

It is obvious that this whole incident was staged for propaganda points.

I suggest we all write to our local newspapers/ radio/TV stations and ask them to boycott Reuters as a source of news. This could also be applied to other biased media sources.

I'm sure that by now everyone knows that the Israelis were about one hundred twenty yards behind the "Blue Line" and Reuters made a half hearted correction for their error.

I'm with Martina, but whatever Daviid thinks, the bias goes so far that I am really surprised HR is not asking some more questions, such as:
1. The UN confirmed that Israeli soldiers were NOT on the Lebanese side of the border. Why does Reuters repeatedly tell us the opposite?
2. Israel informed the UN in advance of the routine pruning operation and complied with the latter's request to delay it, giving the Lebanese the opportunity to set up their ambush and media coverage. Why does Reuters not only not tell us this but imply the opposite?
3. I understand that it is not the Israelis alone who announced that the whole thing was an ambush with the intention of killing an Israeli and deflecting the blame. The fact that the victim of the ambush turned out to be a colonel may or may not have been a "bonus". Does Reuters not have any sources?

IN contrast to the Reuters account, The Sydney Morning Herald (Jason Koutsoukis - Herald correspondent Friday Aug 6 2010) gave a very balanced and truthful account of the incident captioned :
"Lebanese commander ordered sniper attack"
- with no photographs at all. The report posed questions similar to "Honest reporting" and quoted Guy Bechor, a senior analyst of Israeli - Arab affairs from the interdisciplinary Centre at Herzliyah

A classic set-up. These photographers were seemingly willing participants in what was hoped to be a re-ignition of the Lebanon- Israel war. I don't believe that they were duped but they must have been told what to expect. I have grown to expect nothing less from Reuters than bias and lies when it comes to reporting Israel. My only surprise is that the BBC were not there too to revel in yet another 'bad' Israel story.

yES, pINHAS, EXACTLY WHAT I WANTED TO POINT OUT. THE ISRAELIS WERE IN ISRAELI TERRITORY, NO LEBANESE, AS THE UN MADE CLEAR SUBSEQUENTLY. YET THE CAPTIONS ON THESE PHOTOS HAVE NOT BEEN CORRECTED.

Reuters kept mentioning in several captions that Israeli soldiers were on Lebanese territory. The fact is that the security fence was not built exactly on the "Blue line" border due to terrain or obstacles, et cetera.

The soldiers were on the Israeli side of the border, but in the land between the border and the fence. Reuters kept repeating that the Israelis were on Lebanon land. Even a confusing and vague "on the Lebanese side of the Israeli border fence" would have been more accurate.

One thing is clear from the photos: UNIFIL troops were not attempting to stop any fighting and appear to be "embedded" with the LAF. Hand waving and shouting from afar does little if anything. Imagine the world criticism if one of these supposed peace keepers was so much as scratched by Israel.

Since Israel has worked on these trees and bushes before, why the sudden dispute? Why were photos taken of this work before the shooting began? Why were five photographers necessary to take photos of trees being trimmed and bush removed unless they were tipped off to something upcoming?

Also missing from the reports is that the LAF began firing on Israeli troops. The way it is written makes it appear that all parties just started shooting at each other at the same time, and that Israel is to blame for crossing the border - which it did not.

The comments posed by David are reasonable. But these are the same questions posed whenever Israel does anything. "Why was that patrol going down that road at that time. If it had not gone down that road at 22:03 it would not have come under fire." What is good for the goose is sauce for the gander. Questions of how and why the photographers were set up before the shooting began, why was UNIFIL there doing nothing and with the LAF, details of LAF dead and injured but nothing of IDF injured, details of the exact border, and so on are litigate questions which Reuters will probably never answer.

Why is all this pussy-footing going on wondering who told whom about the impending clash.

1. Syria instructed Hisballah to create a diversion to provide 'cover' for the impending UN Hariri probe.

2. The UN notified the Lebanese army and Hisballah of the tree clearing.

3. Hisballah had its 'planted' people in the Lebanese army start the fire fight when all the Reuters photographers were ready to take pictures.

Unfortunately, Israel lost a good officer for no good reason.

I don't see what the problem is that Reuters knew it was going to happen before it happened. That's how news stations work. They find out about events before they happen.
The problem is
1. the UNIFIL tried to stop a possible war by yelling across the border? That's a pretty pathetic effort.
2. the captions and articles all make it seem that Israel started.
3. the UNIFIL (and Lebanese army) don't know which land belongs to the Lebanese and which doesn't? They needed an investigation afterwards in order to determine that?
All in all, the fact that Reuters had an inside source- the thrust of the HR article- isn't the problem. Everything else is.

I am not convinced.

I am profoundly pro-Zionist and am not convinced. The photos, as small as they are, show me nothing whatsoever about how close the photographers were. I take photos with a digital camera and the focus on all these shots is abysmal. These could have been take from a long way off and blown up to the size here.

I have no doubt Reuters has behaved very badly in the past: the photo of the policeman coming to an American boy's rescue in West Jerusalem captioned as the stoning of a Palestinian on the Temple Mount comes to mind as the most egregious one and another of photoshopped smoke in 2006 but these photos do not convince me of anything.

With the obvious anti-Israel bias, I'd contact my local paper, the Washington Post, but I fear that anything would fall on deaf ears (also, see this week's Toles cartoon).

BTW, when this incident took place, Lindsey Lohan was in jail. Maybe Reuters simply had a few extra photogs and needed something to do with them.

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